Amazon is not always the answer

I wrote two years ago about buying food handling gloves from Amazon. That box of 500 lasted until just recently. I have used them regularly while preparing food, but have not been entirely happy with them. They were rather ill-fitting and I couldn’t always get them on fully. That meant if I was chopping something loose floppy glove fingers would get in the way. Rather awkward.

Two years ago I did not fully appreciate what my local Smart & Final had to offer. I have since learned to appreciate the store’s value. For example my Scotch is cheaper there than at BevMo. (And Smart & Final is a lot closer than the nearest BevMo.)

Smart & Final has a good selection of food handling gloves. I bought a box of large gloves, selecting a name brand rather than the S&F house brand. I’m really pleased. They fit well and are highly flexible. I can work much more comfortably wearing them than I ever could with the box I bought from Amazon. The cost for a box of 100 is about the same as what I paid for the box of 500 from Amazon, but the comfort and flexibility they provide make the price difference well worth it.

Sometimes it pays to not reactively default to Amazon.

food handling gloves


Ann Fontaine

We lost Ann Fontaine last week.

Ann was a well-known figure to Episcopalians online. I knew her through her blog, through the Episcopal Café, and through Facebook.

Ann FontaineI was aware that she had some lung issues, but somehow I had the impression that those issues were under control. However, Ann announced before Ash Wednesday that she was not going to observe Lent this year – she had enough to focus on with her own health. She, in effect, put herself into self-managed hospice care. Somewhere around Easter she called in the hospice professionals. Her daughter let us know last week that Ann died peacefully in her sleep.

We will miss her.

I loved reading her blog when she actively maintained it. She was a founder of the Episcopal Café  and an active contributor until recently. I once wrote an article for the Café  in which I described how, though an Episcopalian, I had a big problem with the Trinity and that my theology was much closer to that of rabbinic Judaism. She posted a comment on Facebook saying, “Someone doesn’t understand the Trinity.” That kind of irked me, but she was right. I still don’t understand the Trinity.

Ann was also a Facebook friend. She would occasionally click Like on one of my posts. I appreciated that. She loved baseball, as, of course, do I. She was a big-time Cubs fan. While still in the Bay Area I was a Giants fan, but after moving back to SoCal in 2015 I had no choice but to resurrect my loyalty to the team of my childhood, the Dodgers. There was some discussion a while back about bringing the designated hitter to the National League. Ann posted her outrage to Facebook. A FB friend replied that it wasn’t that big of a deal. And replied, “Yes it is!” I fully agreed with her.

We love you, Ann. We miss you. Rest in peace and rise in glory!


Sacred Music Friday: Hallelujah

Beethoven, Hallelujah from “Christ on the Mount of Olives,” First Plymouth Church, Lincoln Nebraska, Easter Day 2018


planting a mock orange bush

One of the things about yard work is that it is an ongoing process. I generally do yard work on Tuesdays because Wednesday is pickup day when my yard waste (along with our food waste) is whisked off to a stare-of-the-art plant to be turned into natural gas and fertilizer.

mock orange bushMost of my yard work consists of trimming back excess growth and pulling out dead growth. We had a few late freezes this year and lost some plants. In particular we lost a large spread-out mint plant in our front planter. It took me a couple of separate efforts to pull the bulk of it out. When I had done that I was left with a large empty space.

On a recent Saturday I asked Terry if she’d like to find something to fill that spot. I specifically avoided the big box stores and we went to our locally-owned nursery. The staff member there showed us a variety of options, and we settled on a mock orange bush, which should smell really good when it blooms.

It was a lot of work and digging to put it in, but I completed the job and now it’s part of the front yard. I certainly felt that I’d accomplished something.


chicken piccata

I recently made my own take on chicken piccata.

chicken piccataI sliced a boneless skinless chicken breast lengthwise and pounded it. I mixed Harris Ranch lemon garlic seasoning with flour and dredged the chicken in it. I sprayed my stainless steel Calphalon frying pan with olive oil and cooked the chicken. I put it on a plate in the microwave.

I added cooking sherry to the frying pan and then the juice of a large lemon. I rinsed half a jar of capers and threw that in. I nuked the chicken for a minute, put it plates, and covered it with the mixture from the frying pan.

Marvelous, if you’ll allow me to say so. Certainly Terry loved it.


guess I did say that

Last baseball season we didn’t have the Dodgers on TV as we had Frontier Communications. I wrote that we didn’t need the Dodgers on television as we had the MLB at Bat app and could listen to the radio broadcast with Charlie Steiner and Rick Monday.

That was then. This is now. And I have to admit to at least a bit of sour grapes. Because now we have Spectrum and we get the Dodgers on television. I like having the Dodgers on television. Joe Davis is not as bad as I made out. He’s a pretty decent game caller. He’s not Vin Scully, but nobody is except for Vin.

Charlie and Rick are an excellent broadcast team in the finest baseball tradition, and there’s a great baseball tradition in radio broadcasts, but yeah, really, it’s nice to be able to see the Dodgers on TV.


local strawberries

We have a strawberry stand on a busy east-west thoroughfare on the south side of town. They keep decent hours, stay relatively busy, have so-so strawberries, and are expensive.

strawberry standWest and south of town on a country road is a strawberry stand that keeps irregular hours, grows strawberries on site, has the best, sweetest strawberries you can imagine, and charges half the price of the other stand.

You have to time it right, however.

On Friday Terry and I were going to have lunch at Jersey Mike’s. Terry wanted to stop by Lowe’s afterwards. And we were going to get strawberries. We left ten minutes earlier for lunch than the original plan. After lunch Terry said we could do Lowe’s later. We headed for the rural strawberry stand. I was one of the last to get strawberries before they shut down for the day. Had we waited another ten minutes to go to lunch and/or gone to Lowe’s we would have been out of luck. Instead we came home with a three-pack of fresh, sweet strawberries picked literally just minutes before.

Serendipity.

strawberries