Martha

At Good Shepherd Episcopal here in Hemet most of the acolytes are part of one family. In fact they are siblings. They constitute the entirety of the Sunday School class. There are five of them. The oldest, a girl, started college last fall.

Good Shepherd Hemet logoThese kids have not had it easy. I don’t know what happened to their mother, but they were initially being raised by their father, I believe. A number of years ago their father committed suicide. The children’s grandmother, Martha, took on the responsibility of raising them. She took the task seriously and made sure that they were active participants at Good Shepherd.

Last week the kids came home from school and discovered their grandmother dead. How shocking can that possibly have been for the youngsters. For the short term the four youngest have an uncle with whom they are able to live. For the long term almost everything is unknown.

Amazingly, the kids were all at church on Sunday, and three of them were acolytes. But maybe not so amazing. Being with their church community is best possible place they could be right now.

The good news is that Good Shepherd is a tight-knit community. I know that whatever the five might need someone in the church will find a way to provide. In fact, based on Father Rob’s comment on Sunday, members of the parish immediately sprang into action on hearing the news.

For right now the best thing I can do is to pray for the family.


participating in the process

Good Shepherd Hemet logoYou may recall that I am part of the profile committee at Good Shepherd Episcopal, which is responsible for the first step in calling our new rector. I thought perhaps I had been dropped from the committee, as a member of the vestry (the governing board) announced a few weeks ago that the vestry had approved the members of that committee and I had heard nothing. But on a recent Sunday the Senior Warden (board president) asked me what days worked and what days didn’t for me to meet. We had our first meeting last week. It was a video meeting with the Canon (clergy assistant to the bishop) for Transitional Ministries.

The process is very clear and set out. I thought there might be nothing for me to do on the committee, as the other four members are all long-time members with strong personalities. But as it turns out, my role is to be the point person for access to the online Church Assessment Tool (CAT), which is a survey of the parish. That’s a good role for me, computer geek that I am.

It will be an interesting process.


a time of transition

Yesterday was my first time at Good Shepherd since Kathleen’s departure. The Sunday before last was the church’s first Sunday without Pastor Kathleen, but Terry and I were in El Cajon for our nephew Race’s birthday celebration. It was definitely a liminal experience yesterday.

Good Shepherd Hemet logoOur supply priest, Rev. Canon Victoria, filled in during the summer last year, and I really liked her. She very much met my expectations yesterday. I’m glad that she’ll be at Good Shepherd for all of October with the exception of next week.

Yesterday’s service was definitely different. Instead of the elaborate Prayers of the People with music, we used Rite II Form VI with some additions. We didn’t acknowledge birthdays, anniversaries, and thanksgivings or do the prayers for travel or other needs, though those were listed in the bulletin.

It’s going to be a long transition, so I had best learn to be flexible.


the rules are strict

Pastor Kathleen said goodbye to us on 11 September. She had announced her retirement earlier in the summer, so we all knew that the day was coming. Attendance was high for the 10:30 service and the congregation was sad. Kathleen departed from the standard Pentecost green in favor of Advent blue. The parament on the lectern was the Alpha Omega symbol. Just as at the end of the three-part “All Good Things” that brought Star Trek: The Next Generation to a close, there was a conclusion and all was wrapped up. We had closure.

alpha omegaThat was a good thing, because in the Episcopal Church the rule is strict. The departing priest is not allowed to have contact with members of her former parish. There is good reason for this. It is important that we as a parish look forward and not back. We have a profile to write, a search committee to form, and a new rector to call. An interim priest who specializes in assisting congregations in this process will join us in due time.

I was never a high-maintenance parishioner. But I knew if I had a question, needed assistance, or just wanted to share something I could send Kathleen an email and I would get a prompt and helpful response. But no more. Kathleen knows the rules and would not respond to my email were I to send her one.

I will miss Pastor Kathleen. We all will. But the process is clear and the process tells us to move forward.


Eucharistic Prayer C

As I discussed yesterday, when I look at the statistics for this blog I see some recurring themes with respect to those who find this blog via search. One of my blog entries that keeps popping up is one about Eucharistic Prayer C in the Episcopal Book of Common Prayer. I went back and looked at it and I feel a little bit bad about that, because it’s not a very good blog entry. I don’t really say much at all there.

I think Eucharistic Prayer C deserves more attention than that. It is my favorite of all of the Eucharistic prayers. In the Episcopal churches I have attended the standard prayer on most Sundays is Eucharistic Prayer A. At Good Shepherd Episcopal here in Hemet, in the past year we have switched to Eucharistic Prayer B the seasons of Advent, Christmas, and Easter. It’s a nice change, because it forces me to listen to the words, to read along in the prayer book, as opposed to the very familiar words of Eucharistic Prayer A. I don’t think I’ve ever been in a worship service where Eucharistic Prayer D was used.

For me, however, it is Eucharistic Prayer C that has the most powerful words.

God of all power, Ruler of the Universe, you are worthy of
glory and praise.
Glory to you for ever and ever.

At your command all things came to be: the vast expanse of
interstellar space, galaxies, suns, the planets in their courses,
and this fragile earth, our island home.
By your will they were created and have their being.

But the prayer also admonishes us:

Lord God of our Fathers: God of Abraham, Isaac, and
Jacob; God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ: Open our
eyes to see your hand at work in the world about us. Deliver
us from the presumption of coming to this Table for solace
only, and not for strength; for pardon only, and not for
renewal. Let the grace of this Holy Communion make us one
body, one spirit in Christ, that we may worthily serve the
world in his name.
Risen Lord, be known to us in the breaking of the Bread.

The words that stick with me are:

quoteDeliver us from the presumption of coming to this Table for solace only,
and not for strength;
for pardon only, and not for renewal.

Those are words that I need to hear. And hear again.

I wish that I had the opportunity to experience Eucharistic Prayer C more often in worship, but it’s always there in the prayer book whenever I want to turn to it.

You can find Eucharistic Prayer C in the The (Online) Book of Common Prayer. Navigate: The Holy Eucharist > The Holy Eucharist: Rite II > Eucharistic Prayer C.


managing the transition

I wrote recently about my rector’s upcoming departure. When a rector leaves an Episcopal church there is a strict, formal process. It’s is business as usual for the parish as a whole until after the rector’s final Sunday, though less so for the vestry, the church’s governing board. No activity around finding a new rector takes place until after the old rector leaves, and the outgoing rector has no more contact with the parish.

Good Shepherd Hemet logoWhen the old rector leaves an interim rector is called. He or she may show up immediately after the outgoing rector’s last Sunday or the interim might arrive a few weeks later with another available priest filling in in the meantime. The first task after the rector’s departure is to create a parish profile. That profile describes the parish and its personality in detail. It gives the search committee and candidates a template to measure whether a given candidate might be a good match for the parish. Only after the parish profile is complete does the search committee begin its work of finding a new rector.

And why am I telling you this? I’m telling you this because the Senior Warden (board president) asked me to serve on the profile committee. I was surprised, flattered, and honored. It will be a challenge, but I look forward to serving.


Morning Prayer

Pastor Kathleen was away on vacation on Sunday, and she will be next Sunday as well. Rather than bringing in a supply priest to officiate at the Eucharist she recruited lay members of the church who had recently received training in leading worship to guide us through Morning Prayer.

Episcopal Church shieldThere was a time when many Episcopal churches only had Communion once a month. The other Sundays of the month Morning Prayer was observed. I’m glad that is no longer the case. Not because there is anything wrong with the Morning Prayer service, but because Communion is so important to me.

There are a lot of differences between Sunday Eucharist and Morning Prayer.

  • Confession is said at the beginning of the service, rather in the middle.
  • The psalm is read before the other Bible readings, not in the middle of them.
  • The Old Testament lesson is longer than the Sunday reading, providing more context.
  • The three-year Gospel Sunday lectionary cycle is not observed.
  • There is no Gospel procession; we remain seated while the Gospel is read.
  • We read the Apostles’ Creed rather than the Nicene Creed.

I was glad to have had the experience of Morning Prayer. But I will be happy to return to our Rite II Eucharist on the 21st.

By the way, the Episcopal Book of Common Prayer is available online.