Star Trek again

Terry and I have both long been big Star Trek fans. We watched many episodes of Next Generation together, along with Deep Space Nine, Voyager, and Enterprise.  We had a Star Trek-themed wedding, although it was more subtle than blatant. With the end of Enterprise we thought that might have been the end of Star Trek for us. Neither of us has been terribly impressed with the current “young Kirk” movie series starring Chris Pine (although the next movie is rumored to have a kick-ass female captain).

Star Trek DiscoveryI hadn’t paid a lot of attention to the upcoming Star Trek: Discovery series, since it will be on the CBS All Access app. Then I made the mistake of watching the trailers. Wow. Interesting, intelligent, thought-provoking, and cerebral if those trailers are any indication. Looks like a mature Asian female captain, along with Vulcans and Klingons. Fascinating, to quote Spock.

This may be enough for us to shell out for CBS All Access. But we have to wait until September 24th.


listening to baseball

I grew up listening to baseball on the radio. Those familiar voices of Vin Scully and Jerry Doggett were an integral part of my summers. In those days we saw maybe a half dozen games on television. Certainly no more than ten or so. It was via the radio that I learned about baseball and learned to love the game.

These days Terry and I can watch the Angels on television, but our provider does not offer the channel that carries the Dodgers. (That’s a long-standing issue and sore point here in Southern California.) We don’t like to watch TV in the evenings anyway. When we are sitting with our feet up we like to listen to jazz.

I do, however, have the MLB At Bat app on both my iPhone and my iPad, and I have my iPad in front of me each evening after I have read the paper. That means that I can check the score of Dodger game at any time. If it’s getting close to the end of the game and the Dodgers are leading sometimes we’ll turn off the music and I’ll pull up the game on At Bat. We will listen to Charlie Steiner along with Rick Monday call the last couple of innings.

Just like listening to baseball on the radio.


another annoying Food Network trend

If you have been reading this blog for a while you know that I have long been unhappy with the predominance of competition shows on Food Network. Yes, I admit that I really enjoy Cooks vs.Cons, as does Terry. But overall my feeling is that competition shows crowd out actual cooking shows.

Food Network logoThere is another trend that I don’t like. That is the rise of food travel shows. Sister network Cooking Channel heavily promotes Man Fire Food, in which the host travels the country in search of grill, barbecue, or anything else that uses an open flame, and Cheap Eats, in which Ali Kahn tries to eat in a city for a day spending only $35.

But Food Network proper is heading the same direction. Damaris Phillips of Southern at Heart fame has a new show, Super Southern Eats (which mysteriously disappeared after one episode), where she doesn’t cook but rather travels the South in search of good food. Another new show, with a host whose name I don’t recognize, premieres on my birthday where she casts about looking for interesting dishes. All of this is in the venerable tradition of Diners Drive-ins and Dives, but it also takes up time slots that could be devoted to cooking shows.

I would much rather that Damaris had kept the cameras at her beautiful house in Kentucky and shared with us the fine art of Southern cooking.

Ah, Linda Ellerbee, you had it right: “And so it goes.”

 


hearing a familiar voice

Terry and I, you may know, listen to jazz in the evening six nights a week. We listen to the internet stream from KCSM in San Mateo, a station we have enjoyed for many years. For quite some time Saturday evenings were hosted by Michael Burman, a man with a pleasant British accent.

KCSM logoThen early this year he disappeared. First it was someone “filling in for Michael Burman,” but later the shift was officially handed over to someone else. I was disappointed, but got used to it. A few weeks back, however, I was pleased and surprised to hear his voice again. In checking the program grid I was happy to see that the shift is once again his. The station is even doing promos for him during the week.

That makes Saturday evenings just a little more pleasant.


doing something old-fashioned

I did something old-fashioned a couple of weeks ago. I responded to a postal mail solicitation to subscribe to a physical, paper magazine. It was from The Christian Century to which I was a long-time The Christian Centurysubscriber. I let the subscription lapse, along with many other print magazines, when I was laid off in 2014. But I always enjoyed the publication, and the price was really good. In fact I looked for an equivalent price online so I wouldn’t have to wait so long for my subscription to start. I couldn’t find one.

So I wrote a check, put it in the return envelope, and mailed it off. Now I still have probably another four weeks or so before my first issue shows up. But it will be good to be seeing the magazine again.


a good experience with the cable company

Before we arrived here in Hemet in May 2015 we made arrangements for our television/internet/telephone service. We could have gone with Time-Warner and have been able to see the Dodgers games, but consensus was that Time-Warner was a pain to deal with and had poor service. So we chose Verizon, which was easy to get set up since we had Verizon for telephone in Gilroy.

In the intervening time, Time-Warner was bought by Charter Communications and Verizon left the California market (except for wireless), having turned over their phone/internet/television service to Frontier Communications.

Frontier CommunicationsIt was coming up on two years since our service initiation, and that meant an end to our two-year discounts. I got a mailing from Frontier saying that I should call them about a new two-year plan. I dreaded doing that, as I feared a rate increase. I made the call, however, and was pleasantly surprised.

First of all, I got a very friendly representative who was stateside. She was very helpful and told me that instead of the second level channel package plus the HBO/Cinemax combo, I could get the top-level package, which included HBO/Cinemax, plus Showtime and a bunch of other channels. My telephone and internet service would be unchanged. And the cost? $12 less a month than what I had been paying. Still no Dodger games, but we continue to get the Angels.

I’m happy. It’s nice to have a pleasant experience with a service provider.


the incredible shrinking newspaper

We get two newspapers here at home, the Los Angeles Times and the Press-Enterprise. The L.A. Times is doing well in spite of its ownership struggles. The PE has had its own ownership struggles, but is doing not as well.

For some months the business section in the PE has been folded into the back of the front section, rather than being an independent section. Late in the summer our local columnist retired, I suspect not of his own volition. He was not replaced. Shortly thereafter a regional columnist retired, also not replaced.

Press Enterprise mastheadMore recently, the paper eliminated the TV grid and reworked the comics page. On Wednesday, Thursday, and Saturday, when the comics are in the Life (now Lifestyle) section it consists of a whopping four pages.

I care because I grew up with this newspaper. In the sixties it was the morning Daily Enterprise throughout most of Riverside county, and in the city of Riverside it was the afternoon Press. Saturdays and Sundays it was the combined Press-Enterprise. I was a Daily Enterprise paperboy for a number of years, getting up at five a.m. to deliver the paper and collecting subscription fees at the end of the month.

It is a different world now, and the afternoon newspaper has gone the way of the of the dodo bird. But it is hard to see my newspaper facing such hard times.

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