it simply is not true

Mister RogersThere is a story going around, a story that has been going around for some time, that Fred Rogers of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood fame was a Navy Seal, and that he wore long sleeves on his television show to hide his tattoos.

The problem with the story is that it simply isn’t true. The story is pervasive enough that the privately-run Navy Seals web site, navyseals.com, devotes a page to debunking the myth. The go-to site for urban legend accuracy checking, snopes.com, offers a long entry debunking various Mr. Rogers myths, including the Navy Seals and tattoo stories. Snopes states:

quoteAlthough he was friendly with the children in his viewing audience and talked to them on their own level, he was most definitely an authority figure on a par with parents and teachers (he was Mister Rogers to them, after all, not “Fred”), and his choice of dress was intended to establish and foster that relationship.

The Wikipedia entry for Fred Rogers describes how he want straight from college to television work. (Not that Wikipedia is to be trusted in every instance, but this entry is well annotated.)

If you need any more proof, check out the movie trailer for the upcoming Fred Rogers documentary. It shows scenes of him in short sleeves playing on the street with youngsters, not to mention a brief moment picturing him underwater in the pool wearing only swim trunks. Not a single tattoo in either case.

This is, perhaps, much ado about nothing, but I am guilty of spreading this urban legend, so I wanted to set the record straight.


Sacred Music Friday: Let There Be Peace on Earth

The song speaks (sings) for itself, but this selection was inspired by the Prickly City comic strip.

Prickly City comic

 

 


an apology

I have to apologize. The blogger in the cartoon below? That’s me. I recognized myself immediately when I first saw the cartoon. That hurt. But I suppose it’s a good thing that I did recognize me.

I’m hoping that I can say that was me. I want to believe that I’m not that way anymore. I was that way, though. Just ask my friend Lynn, with whom I would meet for coffee before Terry and I moved south. Lynn, I apologize. That’s not a good way to treat a friend.

This cartoon comes, by the way, from the TED talk 10 Ways to Have a Better Conversation given by public radio host Celeste Headlee. I highly recommend it. It has had more than nine million views, and there’s a reason for that.

And in my case I trust that reading my blog is not necessary for friends to learn about what is happening in my life.

cartoon: Read My Blog


Sacred Poetry Friday: On the Pulse of Morning

Over the weekend I stumbled on and caught most of a PBS special about Maya Angelou. I knew she was an amazing woman, but I didn’t realize how amazing. Here is the poem she wrote for Bill Clinton’s first inauguration. Words of hope in unsettling days.


Secular Music Friday: Change of Heart

This Holy Near song is from 1993 and the video is from 2012, but both are as appropriate as ever today. There is an inspiring message of hope here.


a thought for today

A thought on this day of sadness, depression, and despair:

quote“I wish it need not have happened in my time,” said Frodo.

“So do I,” said Gandalf, “and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.”

That is the truth. It is the best we can do for now.

Thanks to my good friend Tahoe Mom for the reminder of this passage.


let’s do better

After the election I noticed the title of an NPR podcast from Weekend Edition. It was about escapist fiction to take your mind off of the election results. Just what I need, I thought. But what was the book editor recommending? Dystopian fiction. Why? Why?  That’s not what I need.

Recently, while downloading Kindle samples for books I saw in the Sunday New York Times Book Review, my Kindle Store web app displayed Dystopian Societies as the first category of suggested titles. Why? Why?

Fr. Phil used up in Morgan Hill used to preach about this. Why envision a dystopian society when we can just as easily envision a utopian society, he asked. Yes, “utopia” means nowhere, but we can make “nowhere” into “now here.” Remember the Belinda Carlisle song “Heaven is a Place on Earth”?

My friend Tahoe Mom writes of hope:

quoteAdvent, a time of waiting. A time of anticipation. A time of Hope. This year more than any I have experienced in a long time, I am in need of Hope. Hope for Light in a time of darkness. Hope for Love in a time of hatred and bigotry. Hope for Laughter in a time of sadness and bewilderment. Hope for Peace in a time of threat. … I must also live in the moment given me already, claiming the promise of Hope for Light and Love, Laughter and Peace.

Please my friends, let’s put our energy not into a dystopia but into heaven as a place on earth. Let’s focus on light, love, laughter, and peace here and now.

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